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20121226
20130103
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CSPAN 8
CSPAN2 6
CNBC 2
MSNBCW 2
WRC (NBC) 2
CNNW 1
FBC 1
KGO (ABC) 1
KOFY 1
WBAL (NBC) 1
WGN (CW) 1
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English 26
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 10:00am EST
borrowing is something they are not able to do. someone who is getting a bachelor of science in nursing can afford to take on more debt than someone getting a degree in religious studies or a low income field. it does not mean you should abandon the degree. it means you should pay attention to the debt, because you may abandon the dream later. >> not all degrees are worth as much is something those of us who love liberal arts in the united states have a hard time coming to grips with. >> or journalism. >> is -- it obviously makes people uncomfortable that the situation is further curtailed by the family were born into. if you are a wonderful high school student, you have to think more about your major and your college than a student born into a wealthy family. how do you balance that with the reality of this crisis. >> one of the things we do at the national consumer law center is direct representation of low-income borrowers as well as speak to thousands of borrowers throughout the country. we do see the effect of this threw out the country. many students do not graduate. there is default.
ABC
Jan 1, 2013 6:00pm PST
idea he used to carry an exhibit around to show people what he meant by a science museum exhibit. >> thejl publicity. these pictures are from a film. c, frank made this one to show how one pendulum will send another into motion. it's part of a must seem mistry. after frank built it he noticed someone made feet to put on:jo the bo<$tf+ so we don't know who did that. >> over the next four decades it grew up. along with generations of families. many people now on staff came here as children. >> i have many memories coming here as a kid. we come here, i demand more time and demand to come back. >> it now has a thousand exhibits in the collection z it's an international leader in who is known as informal education. the staff estimates 08% of the world science centers have exhibits here. they run a hugely successful program training science teachers. the museum has done so well, it's outgrown it's birth i place. so it's movering here to pier 15. the massive building renovations is just about finished then taking three and a half months to move in old exhibits. all ready for a grand op
KOFY
Jan 1, 2013 9:00pm PST
exploratorium while still at the palace of fine arts one more day to do it. hantdz on science museum reopen at new home in april. so admission at the old building is free for now. dan looks back at the report. >> palless of fine arts originally built for the 1915 panama pacific exposition. it was made to lack like an ancient ruin with huge display hall alongside it. half century later that hall would be reborn as revolutionary new museum. >> tornado t.you help mick a tornado. >>reporter: man with the idea was frank oppenheimer. >> whole point of the exploratorium is to make it possible for people to feel they can understand the world around them. i think a lot of people have given up with that understanding. >> frank was a brilliant physicist and educator. he died in 1985 but legacy is intensely alive both in the museum itself and in documentaries including one by filmmaker john els. frank pioneer of the hand on museum. instead of don't touch the exhibit, touching them was essential. at first it was a hard sell. >> really new idea. used to carry an exhibit around in the truching o
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 3:32pm EST
the bang for the box -- the buck. the basic science knowledge. testimony point out that we need to know these things. there are other societal benefits. isn't that really the way we should think of going? if dark basic expansion of knowledge through a government funded entity like nasa -- is that the way we should go? my personal feeling is there is a tremendous value over time that has come close from demand i do believe robotics will be on the time scale of the next 20 years as -- or so. probably as they make predictions, which is always hard. it will have more economic impact on how we were driving our cars and fly our planes and how research is being performed. it is my belief if you go through 30 or more years, that prediction will be a lot tougher to make. want to put the human in the loop and go to places where you do not know where you are going, and two exploration the help of sun cover aspects of our experience and did all aspects of technology that will have tremendous impact. even though they examples you mention are compelling, there are many aspects that come from a human
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 7:00am EST
cuts should be extended and for whom. taxation is not an economic science. it definitely -- if you gather 10 people in a room, you're going to get 10 different opinions and the views on taxing -- on the merits and philosophy of taxing individual asks the rich will vary. but, you know, this sort of immediate problem is not necessarily the larger philosophical question. it really is the more practical question of what is our tax system going to look like. host: and we've got this lead editorial from this morning's "wall street journal." real housewife offense the beltway. they write -- host: back to the phones. don in oklahoma city on our line for democrats. go ahead, don. caller: good morning. i have a couple of quick comments i would like to make. the first is that i find it ironic for so many years in recent history republicans have claimed to own patriotism yet they don't seem to want to vacate their fair share. host: joseph rosenberg. guest: you know, i mean, i'm not sure, you know, i'm not sure this is about pay. -- patriotism or anything like that. you know, the question of wh
CSPAN
Jan 2, 2013 7:00am EST
piece looking at the world will be like in 150 years in the role of science and technology will play in our future. thanks so much for being with us from new york city today. guest: thanks for having me. happy new year. host: why look into the future? guest: you know, the world as we know, the world did not end on december 21st. so, i think this is really good time to look -- we've been all sort of focused on that date, not all of us, some of us. this is a good time to look into the future. we have a very popular department that we do every month called 50 and 100 and 150 years ago. this is where we go back into the archives of scientific american and we pick out things that people were writing and a lot of things people were writing were predictions about what the future would bring. we thought that we would turn it on its head and actually just do a whole package of articles in our january issue which is out on newsstands now. it looks at what could happen scientifically, technologically in the next 50, 100 and 150 years. host: you look at things like drone. also nuclear issues
CSPAN
Dec 31, 2012 10:00am EST
his testimony before the house science, space and technology committee. i know that our chairman mr. hall will remember that during that testimony, he argued eloquently for the critical importance of giving nasa a sustainable future and a human exploration program that can once again inspire our children and humanity around the world. it seems rather extraordinary that even as we are honoring our hero, neil armstrong, that we face a situation where nasa's budget would be designated, getting the very programs that neil armstrong felt so passionately about. if the same members who vote to honor him today will commit to working in the coming months and years for those exploration goals, to those heights to which he devoted the last years of his life, we will have truly honored neil armstrong in an enduring and meaningful way. with that, i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman reserves. the gentleman from texas. mr. hall: madam speaker, i yield five minutes to the very capable majority whip, the gentleman from california, mr. mccarthy. the speaker pro
CW
Jan 1, 2013 9:00pm CST
and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. doctors say they are confident that hillary clinton will make a full recovery after the blood clot was found between her brain and skull. secretary clinton is viewed as a needing a presidential contender in 2016 sif she chooses to run. on the day when hillary clinton was supposed to be returning to workwork she spent another day at a new york hospital being treated with blood thinners, they expect her to make a full recovery and she will not suffer a stroke or neurological damage, her doctor is not involved in her case but he has treated cases like cars and he calls them ryder. the chairman of the department of medicine at atlantic hospital... >> i think for future is as good as her past, she will recover from this and she will be treated with blood thinners, i cannot say how long because i don't know all of the circumstances but certainly a minimum of three-six months. she should recover fully and get back to work. >> and that work is growing, she has traveled to more
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2012 8:00pm EST
know science mismatch is a problem, that although blacks are more likely than whites to nature when they go to college, they're much less like you to get stem degrees, science engineering that degrees if they receive preference. university of virginia found to be taped to blacks or two students of any color, one who receives a preference, one who doesn't, the preference is a 40% larger chance of dropping out of science on this path through. mismatch also affects academic inclined students who receive much preferences for that to become university professors are going to academics someday. predominantly receive low academic grades, cluster at the bottom of the class in the side economics is not for them. the biggest mismatch experiment was in california were voters passed proposition 209 a large cause a natural experiment of what happens when preferences are banned from entire university system. the results aren't extremely curt for anyone who bothers to look. but then i have to nurse at implementation of research quality, the number of blacks in the university of california system
CSPAN
Dec 27, 2012 6:00am EST
research has been done, published in excellent journals. so we now know that science mismatch is a pervasive problem. although blacks are more like listen than similar whites to want to major in science and engineering when they go to college, they're much less likely to get what we call s.t.e.m. degrees if they receive a large preference. a study at the university of virginia found that if you take two blacks or two students of any color, one of whom receives a large presence, one whom momentum, the student who receives a preference has about a 0% larger -- 40% larger chance of dropping out on his way through. mismatch also accepts academically-inclined students who would like to go into academics someday but very predominantly receive low academic grades, cluster at the bottom of the class and decide that economics is not for them. the biggest mismatch experiment was in california where voters passed proposition 209, and we had a large quasi-natural experiment of what happens when racial preferences are banned from an entire university system. the results of prop 209 are ext
NBC
Jan 1, 2013 7:00am EST
science correspondent robert bazell is at columbia university hospital. >> reporter: good morning, andrea. she has a blood clot just below her ear on a blood vessel that drains blood from the brain but critically, it's not in the brain itself, which makes a difference in the prognosis. it's still a dangerous situation. you can see where the red dot there is on the diagram. it's being dissolved with blood thinners and over a period of days and all indications are that she will make a complete recovery. this is a dangerous situation, but she's going to be fine. andrea? >> good news. happy new year to you as well. thank you, robert. >>> now to the weather. scattered showers and thunderstorms are likely today throughout the southeast and gulf coast. some areas may receive over an inch of rain. isolated snow showers through the ohio valley and into the virginias with one to three inches of snow. snow. and heavier amounts over higher elevations. much of the country remains quite chilly with temperatures below average and partly cloudy conditions through the western united states. that's a look
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 9:00am EST
this freakish weather and all the sciences is so overwhelming about claimant count yet you don't see on the nightly news. is there a story that you wanted to grab by the scruff of the neck during her tenure at abc and say, we've got to cover this more? >> there were several. we would have discussions about. one of them was the environment and how we covered the environment. and every time we try to do a primetime special environment we wouldn't get a rating. that led, it's one of the chapters i write about, what i do not come across well. we had leonardo dicaprio india president clinton. we got killed for it. we did a primetime environmental special, and he was chairman of earth day that you and i thought he would just make an appearance. i got killed for. that was an attempt to try to cover the environment in a serious way and drive an audience. i was concerned, frankly, about our terrorism coverage. we did more terrorism coverage than others did before 9/11. jon miller went in and interviewed bin laden, trekked into the mountains in afghanistan and interviewed him. we get a primeti
CNBC
Jan 2, 2013 6:00pm EST
was at 5. their science is so much more superior to everybody else's when it comes to this macular degeneration, i think the stock -- buy buy buy, is going to 200. mike until nebraska? >> caller: happy new year, boo-yah, jim. >> same. >> caller: win -- >> no, i'm not convinced. i don't like these other companies that are, that started out as wireline companies to try to do more. it's not good enough. broadband, to me it's not working, you can stick with it but i don't like it. matt in new york? >> caller: boo-yah, thanks for taking my call, jim. >> what's going on? >> caller: i'm getting into stocks. i'm wondering what your opinion is on. >> which one? >> nike, nke? >> i think nike is terrific. i believe in the return in china, north america, doing terrifically. splits the stock, it's a $50 stock, i think it can go to $60. glen in virginia? >> caller: jim, i'm a long-time listener i want to thank you for helping me get back to even sometime ago. >> you're terrific for saying that, thank you so much. howky help? >> caller: i'm retired living on dividends, my favorite stock is triang
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2012 7:00am EST
universities and allow more education in science and mathematics in the school system which would allow more people to do research in this field. to allow more electric energy instead of so much depending on petroleum and oil. guest: about the education system. the second question is about the role of private enterprise in these technologies. education is the silver bullet and the thing that we can do most cheaply and easily to get kids excited about solving big problems. it needs to begin not in universities but at elementary and high school level education. every year we choose 35 young innovators who we believe have the greatest capacity to change the world. this year most of the 35 lived and worked in the united states, less than five had gone to elementary school in the united states. they came from china, europe, israel. we are not doing a good job in the states in making science and technology a profitable activity, where kids can commit their entire lives and careers to it. the best thing we can do is to invest in science and technology and mathematics education in our elementary and
CNBC
Dec 28, 2012 3:00pm EST
straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> about three minutes left and we're closing out the week near the lows of the week. this is the dow this week, and generally the hopes for a fiscal cliff resolution have been coming down here, and nowhere has it been more evident than just in the last hour. let me show you today's chart of the dow. early on we had the rumors that maybe the president had some new scaled down proposal to offer at the white house meeting, and then our eamon javers reported that that is not the case, and that's what took this market lower, and we're near the lows, down 138 points. my friend ben willis, you've been one of the more optimistic traders on the floor, optimistic we'd get a resolution. willing to buy the dips and now this happened. >> the chart you just showed, mr. obama not buying anything newnew. anybody buying the dips had to puke them out. that's exactly what happened. professional traders, most of which have been in this week, most others on the s
CNN
Dec 30, 2012 6:00am PST
? will we get something more in line with what the president want up science. >> i hope for a by partisan solution to pass. >> beyond the hope, do you think the chances are good? >> we're not there yet. we're trying to line up rubik's cube right now. this will continue until tomorrow. my goal is to help keep tax rates down for all americans. i think it hurts our economy if tax rates go up. that's why i'm concerned for the future and the growth of our economy and jobs. >> what is your all's sense of something that could pass what appears even from the first part of the conversation? the divides line is so bright. >> i'm optimistic, candy. i am he. i think the practical reality is come january 1 we begin to see the average middle class family having their taxes go up about $2200. one mom said to me in michigan, that's four months of groceries. that's commuting back and forth to work in gas for up to three years. i mean, that's a lot of money. i really do think even though there's great divides about the role of the wealthy in the country and whether she should be part of the solution, i do
CSPAN
Jan 2, 2013 5:00pm EST
religion, science, philosophy sports whether the in player got it right last week , whether or not the matter of dark matter will be discovered by micha physicist's rather than astrophysicists this is all a part of the speech and thought and believed that protected by the first amendment we can't think of it justin political as important as that is. and there is a third dimension in the speech that allows you to define your persona, your personality. your beliefs are who you are. and this is and the central human right. now, the supreme court and its first amendment cases have protected speech that is hideous. we only get those cases. [laughter] we had a case recently protecting speech videos where it was described to me. i never look at these things. women in spiked heels killing. those are in the protected speech. we protected speech when the day of the funeral, the servicemen killed in the elite. there were protesters using derogatory words about gay saying the military is when to be doomed to provision b
CSPAN
Dec 28, 2012 8:00pm EST
got his ba in political science from the university of florida and m.a. and phd from the university of michigan. so he speaks for the heartland of our great country. >> the automobile industry. last night and he was stopping production of vx. the electors frequently, as solid and no satisfactory radio and television shows onto human kind. even norm has competed for the misquotations in any given year and multimedia. norm is a resident scholar at the american enterprise institute for public policy research. he writes a column for roll call. he's written for every publication on the face of the earth. he and tom both have been on the news hour with jim lehrer, and "nightline" charlie rose. he has another heart and are coming ba, magna laude from university of minnesota and a phd from university of michigan, which is where you guys met. i just have to say that one of the reasons why i think tom and warm is so much attention the outlook piece is because they have been spending their entire lives being so moderate and reasonable that would make it not, there really must be something wron
CSPAN
Dec 28, 2012 11:00pm EST
chair, had a governmental studies program, got his ba in political science from university of florida in this animated phd from the university of michigan. so he speaks for the heartland of our great country. >> any cd automobile industry. [laughter] >> and was opposed by stopping production of the units sold. the electors are solid in all and is on every show known to humankind. they've often competed for the most quotations in any given year than all of our media. norm is a resident scholar at the representative for public policy research. the election analyst for cbs and has written for every publication on the face of the earth dirty and tom both have been on the news hour with jim lehrer, "nightline," charlie rose. he has another heartland are, ba university of minnesota phd from the university of michigan, which is where you guys met. i just have to say that one of the reasons why i think that tom and norm for so much attention is because they have been spending their entire lives being so moderate and reasonable that when they get mad, they really must be something wrong. so wh
MSNBC
Dec 29, 2012 7:00am PST
... or wonderfully the market's behaving... which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> since this show began in february, we have closed out nearly every saturday program with a segment called "foot soldiers" and it is a feature highlighting one person or group who has created positive action in the communities for change. this is large or small. and the foot soldiers have ranged from the three new jersey girls who was a presidential moderator, to dr. mcstuffins who shows girls they, too, can be doctors. and the father and son teen who got out to get out the vote for people during hurricane isaac and simply because they had a vote, and activism. all of our foot soldiers are changing our lives. f for the first time ever, i have a table full of them. and i am joined by a director of a support for children whose parents are in prison, and also, a founder for children of lgbt youth, and also project director of a center for victims of sexual assault, and also, the drek er tor of osborne association which offers rehabilitation for those in the criminal justice system. i
NBC
Jan 2, 2013 7:00am EST
or dropping off the wagon. you know, this is brand new science. this is a plan that basically says, you can eat all your calories in your day but you're going to start eating in eight-hour windows even just three days a week, 11:00 to 7:00, 9:00 to 5:00. >> it's controversial. again it goes against some of the things we're going to talk about go against things we've been taught for years. the claims are pretty dramatic. you say if you follow this diet you'll look younger, feel younger and dramatically reduce your risk for getting the major diseases of our time. >> we're sleeping less than ever, working more than ever and eating more than ever, not giving our bodies a chance to process all of the food that we're taking in and all the toxins. by feasting for eight hours and fasting for 16 -- >> of famine -- >> even just three days a week, you'll reset your body to get on that path. i lost seven pounds in ten days when i adopted the plan. >> by the way, people could lose 20 pounds in six weeks. let's start. breakfast, the most important meal of the day? not according to you. >> delay breakfast
CSPAN
Dec 31, 2012 7:00am EST
rocket science. stop spending money we don't have. cut back on what we do spend and stop sending money to our enemies. now, there's a novel idea. paul from beaumont, said this. we don't have a revenue problem. instead, it's been a spending problem and it's been a spending problem for a long time. larry said, if i'm ute of cash i stop -- if i'm out of cash, i stop spending. perhaps congress should do the same what i do in my house. when i don't have enough money i stop spending. congress has a printing press backed by the chinese. ashley says, spending must be stopped. just taking more from americans is not good. if my taxes aren't affected, my employers are. what will happen to me in the long run? i guess i'm going to find out. yes, you are going to find out here on new year's eve. i am fed up on not agreeing to a budget and this out-of-control action has got to stop. renee from crosby, texas, said this. please demand that spending be cut, fraud, waste and abuse be stopped in government spending and address this before anybody thinks about raising taxes on hardworking americans. mr. sp
MSNBC
Jan 2, 2013 3:00am PST
because, of course, this is science hour, of course, but i was just reading up on this, but, you know, in rats, even in dogs and other animals, the calorie-restricted diets do increase the life span by one-third. they did a study on primates. it doesn't seem to actually translate to primates. therefore, people are assuming it doesn't translate to humans. >> just read this story because you want to have it in context. it does not mean you eat bgarbae that's out there. >> obviously you have to eat right. the book you're writing, there's some people that actually eat well are never hungry. maybe slightly overweight, but they eat healthy. those people are fine. >> yeah. and that's a hard diet to accomplish in the food environment that we live in, which is what i'm writing about. >> not if you wrap it all with bacon which is what i do. >> you have a resolution. >> what is the resolution? >> he's going to lose weight. he's going to get in really good shape. >> i think i'm looking pretty good right now. >> right. >> you look slightly overweight. >> i'm doing all right. >>> with us now, chief
CSPAN
Dec 31, 2012 12:00pm EST
and financing, if you look at the statistics are round or they measure the performance in mathematics, science, and reading, you can see where the problem is. today, they were in the number 27, 28, and so on. productivity generally is the x factor that accommodates for 60% of why one country grows and another does not. generally, it includes things like political dynamic, so we know what is happening there. that is not my prediction. look at this framework, capital, labor, productivity. you will see why i am incredibly bullish. in terms of capital, these economies by a large did not have the debt burden that other countries are facing right now. why is that important? these countries are not suffering from a deal leveraging problem. 60%-70% is under the age of 25. in you got there, over 50% is under the age of 15. we can talk about that once i sit down. once again, a really interesting story. they were talking about 30% increases over goods and services. in virtually all statistics, things like political improvements and freedoms, this is really essential. countries like rwanda have been ranke
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)